High stakes: Daredevil gambles hundreds of feet above Las Vegas as he sets new slackline world record (… but not before taking a tumble!)

Posted: May 17, 2014 by kirisyko in Balance, Slacklining
Tags: , , ,

  • Thrill seeker rolls the dice as he crosses one-inch line 480ft above the famous Las Vegas strip in a world record bid
  • Andy Lewis succeeding in making the 360ft crossing outside Mandalay Bay hotel without falling on the third attempt
  • He insists people are ‘too afraid to take risks’ as he picks up record for longest slackline walk in urban environment

A fearless daredevil rolls the dice hundreds of feet above Las Vegas on his way to setting a new world record.

Thrill-seeker Andy Lewis from Moab in Utah, USA, upped the stakes as he carefully edged 360ft across the one-inch wide line 480ft above the hustle and bustle of the famous party strip below.

The walk broke the world record for longest distance walked on a slackline in an urban environment.

Fearless Andy Lewis adjusts his arms and thrusts his hips to the left as he balances precariously on a one-inch wide line hundreds of feet above the ground in Las Vegas. Cars and trees look like tiny models from the lofty position above the city's airport

Fearless Andy Lewis adjusts his arms and thrusts his hips to the left as he balances precariously on a one-inch wide line hundreds of feet above the ground in Las Vegas. Cars and trees look like tiny models from the lofty position above the city’s airport

Don't look down: Andy Lewis leans precariously to his right and grabs the safety rope attaching him to the line during his world record attempt. He is 480ft above the hustle and bustle of the famous Las Vegas party strip

Don’t look down: Andy Lewis leans precariously to his right and grabs the safety rope attaching him to the line during his world record attempt. He is 480ft above the hustle and bustle of the famous Las Vegas party strip

Thrill seeker Andy Lewis plunges from the slackline and is left dangling upside down with just a rope, clips and a harness preventing him from crashing to the ground below. The dramatic tumble happened as he made a number of attempts to cross a 360ft line installed above an airport in Las Vegas

Thrill seeker Andy Lewis plunges from the slackline and is left dangling upside down with just a rope, clips and a harness preventing him from crashing to the ground below. The dramatic tumble happened as he made a number of attempts to cross a 360ft line installed above an airport in Las Vegas

Hanging tough: Andy Lewis, from Moab in Utah, grabs hold of the line as he dangles hundreds of feet above the ground and grimaces as he looks to heave himself back up

Hanging tough: Andy Lewis, from Moab in Utah, grabs hold of the line as he dangles hundreds of feet above the ground and grimaces as he looks to heave himself back up

Despite the buzzing drones, constant planes taking off at McCarran International Airport and swirling wind, Mr Lewis was able to make it across the line without falling on his third attempt.

He said: ‘The lifestyle behind slacklining has all the metaphors – one step at a time, keep in balance, control your fate… it directly translates to life.

‘People don’t want to watch you do things like that but it’s horrible in life today there’s no respect for skill anymore – people are too afraid to take risks.

The frightening extent of thrill-seeker Andy Lewis's challenge is laid bare in this photograph as he inches across the slackline in Las Vegas. Much of the busy McCarran International Airport is visible down below the 480ft line as he makes another attempt to set a new world record and make the crossing without falling

The frightening extent of thrill-seeker Andy Lewis’s challenge is laid bare in this photograph as he inches across the slackline in Las Vegas. Much of the busy McCarran International Airport is visible down below the 480ft line as he makes another attempt to set a new world record and make the crossing without falling

Andy Lewis concentrates and almost manages a smile as he balances with one foot across the one-inch line. Despite the buzzing drones, constant planes taking off at McCarran International Airport, pictured below, and swirling wind at 480ft, he was able to make it across the line without falling on his third attempt

Andy Lewis concentrates and almost manages a smile as he balances with one foot across the one-inch line. Despite the buzzing drones, constant planes taking off at McCarran International Airport, pictured below, and swirling wind at 480ft, he was able to make it across the line without falling on his third attempt

Andy Lewis holds one arm to the side and one aloft as he slowly works his way along the line. His walk broke the world record for longest distance walked on a slackline in an urban environment

Andy Lewis holds one arm to the side and one aloft as he slowly works his way along the line. His walk broke the world record for longest distance walked on a slackline in an urban environment

Meanwhile, another slackline expert Hayden Nickell hooks his feet over a line hundreds of feet above the ground in Las Vegas and poses for pictures as he performs a daredevil balancing trick with just a rope, clips and a harness as safety measures

Meanwhile, another slackline expert Hayden Nickell hooks his feet over a line hundreds of feet above the ground in Las Vegas and poses for pictures as he performs a daredevil balancing trick with just a rope, clips and a harness as safety measures

Any Lewis puts one foot on the line and another on a ledge as he prepares to set off on another daredevil crossing. Meanwhile another expert crosses in the background holding his arms out wide for extra balance

Any Lewis puts one foot on the line and another on a ledge as he prepares to set off on another daredevil crossing. Meanwhile another expert crosses in the background holding his arms out wide for extra balance

‘Risk isn’t bad you can be the safest person on the planet and still crash your car any day.’

Slacklining typically uses nylon or polyester webbing installed between two anchor points. Whereas tightrope walking involves walking along a rigid line, slacklines involve more bounce and stretch and can be adjusted to suit the user.

Mr Lewis’s incredible skill was captured by keen photographer Dan Krauss who said: ‘Slacklining is all based on concentration and mental discipline – as soon as you lose your focus you will lose your balance.

‘In the desert you’re usually alone with yourself, your friends and nature with not much to distract you except your thoughts.

‘But with an urban line there are countless distractions making it extremely difficult to concentrate on your balance.

‘People seemed pretty shocked and couldn’t believe what was happening up there – they seemed excited.’

Easy does it: Andy Lewis pauses to correct his balance on another crossing. He eventually broke the world record for walking the longest distance on a slackline in an urban environment when he completed the task without falling on his third attempt

Easy does it: Andy Lewis pauses to correct his balance on another crossing. He eventually broke the world record for walking the longest distance on a slackline in an urban environment when he completed the task without falling on his third attempt

Andy Lewis takes up a relaxed looking pose as he takes a breather under the huge Mandalay Bay hotel sign high above the streets of Las Vegas

Andy Lewis takes up a relaxed looking pose as he takes a breather under the huge Mandalay Bay hotel sign high above the streets of Las Vegas

Slackline world record holder Andy Lewis carries out safety checks on the slackline which was installed between two 63rd floor towers of the luxury Mandalay Bay Hotel in Las Vegas

Slackline world record holder Andy Lewis carries out safety checks on the slackline which was installed between two 63rd floor towers of the luxury Mandalay Bay Hotel in Las Vegas

Andy Lewis said of his daredevil stunt: 'The lifestyle behind slacklining has all the metaphors - one step at a time, keep in balance, control your fate... it directly translates to life.'

Andy Lewis said of his daredevil stunt: ‘The lifestyle behind slacklining has all the metaphors – one step at a time, keep in balance, control your fate… it directly translates to life.’

Thrill seeker Andy Lewis, who uses ropes and harnesses as safety devises, says 'people are too afraid to take risks' these days'

Thrill seeker Andy Lewis, who uses ropes and harnesses as safety devises, says ‘people are too afraid to take risks’ these days’

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